Quality of life and its relationship with different anthropometric indicators in adults with obesity

Willen Remon Tozetto, Larissa dos Santos Leonel, Jucemar Benedet, Giovani Firpo Del Duca

Abstract


Introduction: Obesity compromises the quality of life. However, few studies have investigated the influence of different anthropometric indicators on the quality of life of this population. Objective: We aimed to correlate the physical and mental components of quality of life and verify its association with different anthropometric indicators in adults with obesity. Methods: A cross-sectional study was conducted in adults with obesity [body mass index (BMI) ≥30 kg/m²]. The quality of life was investigated using the SF-36 questionnaire, with scores ranging from 0 (worst-case scenario) to 100 (best scenario for the outcome). The anthropometric indicators used were BMI, waist circumference, waist/height ratio (WHR), and lean and fat body mass. For analysis, Spearman’s correlation and crude and adjusted linear regression for sociodemographic variables were used. Results: A total of 75 subjects (nfemales=47; µage=34. ±7.1 years) were included, and their means of the physical and mental components were 64.5±15.9 and 50.8±21.3 points, respectively. The social functioning domain presented a strong positive correlation (r=0.760) with the mental health domain, and eight moderate correlations (0.400≤r≥0.699) were found between the different domains of the questionnaire. The functional capacity domain and the physical component presented a moderate negative correlation with the WHR (r=-0.402 and r=-0.407, respectively). After adjustment, the WHR was inversely associated with the physical component (β=-1.197; p=0.002). Conclusion: In adults with obesity, important correlations were observed between the physical and mental components of quality of life, and the waist/height ratio was the only anthropometric indicator correlated and associated with the physical component of the outcome.


Keywords


Abdominal fat. Body fat distribution. Cross-sectional studies. Mental health.



DOI: https://doi.org/10.1590/fm.2021.34102

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